Félicie de Fauveau Conference (April 4&5, 2013)

De Fauveau’s newly restored monument at Santa Croce

The city of the Renaissance makes room for the nineteenth century. On April 4 and 5, Florence’s most renowned nineteenth-century scholars will gather together to present a lecture series called Félicie de Fauveau: the workshop of a French woman artist in nineteenth-century Florence. Art historians Carlo Sisi, Enrico Colle, Silvia Mascalchi and Silvestra Bietoletti will discuss the artistic, political and social trends that influenced De Fauveau and her art. De Fauveau’s life and relationships provide a unique window onto the Grand Duchy under Leopoldo II and her work suggests the popularity of Neo-gothic styles and the Dantesque revival. Two sculptures by De Fauveau will also be unveiled during the event, after recent restoration projects sponsored by the Advancing Women Artists Foundation (AWA). Restorer Gabriella Tonini will spotlight new discoveries on the artist’s techniques and conference participants will be able to appreciate the sculptures on site at Santa Croce and Santa Maria del Carmine. This free two-day event is being organized by the Advancing Women Artists Foundation in collaboration with The Florentine and Opera di Santa Croce, with the patronage of the Comune di Firenze and the Polo Museale Fiorentino.

De Fauveau’s newly restored monument at Santa Croce

About the artist: De Fauveau was a Tuscan-born artist who lived and trained in France in the early nineteenth-century. A high-society sculptress who Stendhal called ‘a new Canova’, De Fauveau was a favorite in the French court of Charles X, and her art supported the continuity of the Bourbon Monarchy. When Louis Philippe took the French throne in 1829, De Fauveau donned a man’s political uniform and supported the Resistance Movement in Vandee, an uprising for which she was imprisoned. In 1833 the artist escaped to Florence, when she remained in voluntary exile until her death in 1886. Inspired by traditional Medieval art, she was an eccentric artist who looked to Cellini as her model. Her workshop, in Florence’s San Frediano district, brought together numerous artisans working in various mediums including bronze, marble, gold and ebony.

De Fauveau’s Florentine studio

Event details

Félicie de Fauveau: the workshop of a French woman artist in nineteenth-century Florence

Thursday, April 4, 2013  – 3.30pm-5.30pm – Santa Maria del Carmine’s Sala della Colonna

Friday, April 5, 2013  – 3.30pm-5.30pm – Santa Croce’s Sala della Colonna

Admission: Free.

Download the PDF poster

For more information, email: invisiblewomen@theflorentine.net

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