Women Artists of Early Modern Italy Conference

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From 9am to 4.30pm on Friday, March 2, art historians and aficionados are gearing up for Women Artists of Early Modern Italy: New Archival Studies, presented by the ‘Jane Fortune Research Program on Women Artists in the Age of the Medici’, The Medici Archive Project and Florence’s State Archives.

Expect various lectures by keynote scholars focusing on the Florentine experiences of well-loved Baroque master, Artemisia Gentileschi, including a landmark presentation of a newly discovered, signed work the artist is believed to have completed in Naples during the last year of her life. These ground-breaking studies are the perfect follow-up for Milan’s recent monographic exhibition in Palazzo Reale, where all of the artist’s Florentine canvases were presented, including David and Bathsheba, which the Advancing Women Artists Foundation restored after 363 years of neglect in the city’s deposits.

The program will focus on Italy’s most renowned women artists—from refined Venetian portraitist Rosalba Carriera to Sofonisba Anguissola, the skilled Cremonese court painter with a flair for realism. The pioneering Lavinia Fontana, heir to her father’s painterly talents, will also be one of the day’s most distinguished protagonists; she produced more than 100 works of art during her lifetime and is considered the first women in western Europe whose fame proved comparable to the acclaim achieved by her many male counterparts in the 1600s.

The program foresees the study of lesser-known artists including Camilla Guerrieri Nati, daughter of Giovan Francesco Guerrieri, a naturalist painter from Le Marche who was strongly influenced by both Caravaggio and Orazio Gentileschi, Artemisia’s father. A court artist for the Medici, Camilla was also responsible for creating various large-scale religious works and portraiture. Baroque nun painter and sculptor Suor Maria de Dominicis will also be featured. A skilled Baroque artist, de Dominicis was chosen by her master, the knighted Calabrese painter Mattias Preti, to create the female figures for the Church of San Giovanni Calabita’s vaulted ceiling. As a sculptor, she was a protégée of Princess Donna Teresa Avalos who brought her to Rome in 1682 to learn from leading artists like Carlo Maratti and genius realist Gian Lorenzo

Bernini. Minor artist Carla Franchini collaborated with her husband, painter Filippo Franchini, who apprenticed to the infamous Agostino Tassi, condemned for raping Artemisia Gentileschi and charged with innumerable other violent crimes.

Hosted at the Auditorium at Florence’s State Archives in Via Viale Giovine Italia 6, the event is open to the public. Admission is free.

COMPLETE PROGRAM CALENDAR

 

Women Artists of Early Modern Italy: New Archival Studies

Friday, March 2, 2012 – Florence State Archives, Auditorium
Viale Giovine Italia 6 – Florence

9:00  INTRODUCTIONS

Dr. Carla Zarrili, Director, Archivio di Stato, Firenze

Dr. Jane Fortune, Board member of the Medici Archive Project (to be read by Dr. Sheila Barker)

Dr. Alessio Assonitis, Director of the Medici Archive Project

 

9:30 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Sheila ffolliott, Professor emerita, George Mason University:

“More than Famous:” Women Artists in Early Modern Europe

 

10:00 -10:50 THE REPUTATION AND COLLECTING OF WOMEN ARTISTS IN EARLY MODERNITY

Roberta Piccinelli, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at The Medici Archive Project:

Medici Collectors of Women Artists in the Seventeenth Century
Barbara Tramelli, Pre-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte in Berlin:

Sofonisba Anguissola ‘Pittora de Natura’: A Page from Van Dyck’s Italian Sketchbook

 

11:00-12:45  THE LIVES AND CAREERS OF EARLY WOMEN ARTISTS, PART I

 

Cecilia Gamberini, Doctoral Student, Universidad Autònoma de Madrid:

A Documented Reconstruction of Sofonisba Anguissola’s Life at the Spanish Court

 

Sheila Barker, Director, The Jane Fortune Research Project:

Artemisia Gentileschi’s Tumultuous Florentine Years
Claire Eskander, Junior Researcher, The Jane Fortune Research Project:

Problems and Hypotheses: Artemisia Gentileschi and Her Family

 

Lisa Goldenberg Stoppato, Coordinator of Educational Programs, The Medici Archive Project:

Arcangela Paladini: from Convent to Court

 

12:45-1:10 PANEL DISCUSSION WITH MORNING SPEAKERS

 

1:10-2:00 Lunch Break (lunch for speakers and guests at the Archivio di Stato)

 

2:00-2:50 FINDING NEW WORKS BY WOMEN ARTISTS

 

Adelina Modesti, ARC Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, La Trobe University, Melbourne:

A Newly Discovered Late Work by Artemisia Gentileschi

 

Myrtò Psicharis, Junior Researcher, The Jane Fortune Research Project:

A Style of Her Own: A New Attribution to Agnese Dolci

 

3:00-4:40 THE LIVES AND CAREERS OF EARLY WOMEN ARTISTS, PART II

 

Julia Vicioso, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at The Medici Archive Project:

Notes on Women Artists in the Archive of San Giovanni dei Fiorentini in Rome: Costanza Franchini, Lavinia Fontana and Suor Maria de Dominicis


Eve Straussman-Pflanzer, Associate Curator of European Painting and Sculpture before 1750, The Art Institute of Chicago:

The Foremost Female Medici Court Artist: Archival Evidence of the Life and Career of Camilla Guerrieri Nati

 

Heiner Krellig, Lecturer, Freie Universitaet Berlin

Rosalba’s business dealings. New documentary evidence on the life of the “Best Woman Painter in Europe”

 

Martina Manfredi, Post-Doctoral Researcher, University of Pisa:

Female Artists as Entrepreneurs. Carlotta Amigoni: a Venetian Paintress in Georgian London

 

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